The Reverend Horton Heat

with Big Sandy and Wayne The Train Hancock

The Reverend Horton Heat

Thu Dec 2

The Reverend Horton Heat

with Big Sandy and Wayne The Train Hancock

Doors: 7:00 pm
Start: 8:00 pm
Age: Ages 21+ Only
Price:$25-$28
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Event Information

This show has been rescheduled from Aprl 10, 2020. All tickets purchased will be honored. 


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Genre: Rock


Ticket Price: $25 advanced / $28 day of show / $44 reserved loft seating (loft seating is available over the phone or in person at our box office)


There are No Refunds or Exchanges on tickets once purchased. 

The Reverend Horton Heat

Loaded guns, space heaters, and big skies. Welcome to the lethal littered landscape of Jim Heath’s imagination. True to his high evangelical calling, Jim is a Revelator, both revealing & reinterpreting the country-blues-rock roots of American music. He’s a time-traveling space-cowboy on a endless interstellar musical tour, and we are all the richer & “psychobillier” for getting to tag along.

Seeing REVEREND HORTON HEAT live is a transformative experience. Flames come off the guitars. Heat singes your skin. There’s nothing like the primal tribal rock & roll transfiguration of a Reverend Horton Heat show. Jim becomes a slicked-back 1950′s rock & roll shaman channeling Screamin' Jay Hawkins through Buddy Holly, while Jimbo incinerates the Stand-
Up Bass. And then there are the “Heatettes”. Those foxy rockabilly chicks dressed in poodle-skirts and cowboy boots slamming the night away. It’s like being magically transported into a Teen Exploitation picture from the 1950′s that’s currently taking place in the future.

Listening to the REVEREND HORTON HEAT is tantamount to injecting pure musical nitrous into the hot-rod engine of your heart. The Reverend’s commandants are simple.

ROCK HARD,
DRIVE FAST,
AND LIVE TRUE.

And no band on this, or any other, planet rocks harder, drives faster, or lives truer than the Reverend Horton Heat. These “itinerant preachers” actually practice what they preach. They live their lives by the Gospel of Rock & Roll.

From the High-Octane Spaghetti-Western Wall of Sound in “Big Sky” — to the dark driving frenetic paranoia of “400 Bucks” – to the brain-melting Western Psychedelic Garage purity of “Psychobilly Freakout” — The Rev’s music is the perfect soundtrack to the Drive-In Movie of your life.

Jim Heath & Jimbo Wallace have chewed up more road than the Google Maps drivers. For twenty-
five Psychobilly years, they have blazed an indelible, unforgettable, and meteoric trail across the globe with their unique blend of musical virtuosity, legendary showmanship, and mythic imagery.

“Okay it’s time for me to put this loaded gun down, jump in my Five-Oh Ford, and nurture my pig on the outskirts of Houston. I’ll be bringing my love whip. See y’all later.” - Carty Talkington Writer/Director

Rev your engines and catch the sermon on the road as it’s preached by everybody’s favorite Reverend. Don’t forget to keep an eye out for the 11th studio album from REVEREND HORTON HEAT, boldly titled Rev, due out January 21st.

Wayne The Train Hancock

A Wayne “The Train” Hancock album is as refreshing as a beer pulled from a tub of ice on a summer’s day. You stick your hand deep into that tub, you know it’s gonna be cold, and you know it’s gonna be beer, but, dang, if it ain’t always a kick how surprisingly JUST RIGHT it is. Slingin’ Rhythm is just right, a finely honed, day-in-the-life brand of juke joint rhythm sitting in the sweet spot of American music invention between country, hillbilly, jazz and western swing.

And while “The Train” is indeed a throwback, the funny thing is, the more retro he gets, the fresher he sounds. His songs about the everyday and the everyman, with their driving pulse and live-in-the-moment vibe, have a character and passion that go beyond a particular time.

Even though it’s been over three years since his last album, Ride, no grass has grown under Wayne’s boots—he’s on the road 200 days a year. Slingin’ Rhythm, with its emphasis on off-the-cuff instrumental interplay and extended soloing, Wayne and his band drive down the centerline between tight and loose. Like a latter day Bob Wills, spontaneously calling out encouragement, or Hank Sr and Ernest Tubb effortlessly knocking out smile-through-the-pain honky-tonk, Wayne “The Train” Hancock delivers an unvarnished, BS-free restorative.

When it comes to classic trope of the murder ballad, the subject is often spoken through metaphor or deeply formalized imagery. Not so with Wayne. He gets to the point in “I Killed Them Both” with a chilling bluntness that’d make Johnny Paycheck nod with approval. The thing is, though, you might miss the tragedy at first because that bouncy back beat will have you on the dance floor. On the languid lament “Dog Day Blues” you can feel the sweat rolling down the back of your neck. The attention to detail in “Small Bouquet of Roses” paints a distinct picture of heartbreak.

Wayne teamed up once again with his producer-for-life Lloyd Maines (Terry Allen, Uncle Tupelo, Dixie Chicks, Ray Wylie Hubbard) and recorded on the fly, never doing a song the same way twice. That’s what gives Slingin’ Rhythm its relentless energy—and with a band this killer, you’ve got to let them off the leash. “2 String Boogie” and Merle Travis’s “Divorce Me C. O. D.” bounce along on crisp, jazzy guitar licks, referencing masters like Chet Atkins and Hark Garland right up through the neo-retro scenesters like Deke Dickerson. And the loungy Texas swing in “Wear Out Your Welcome” and the instrumental “Over Easy” freshens up the template laid out by the great Texas Playboy steel player Leon McAuliffe.

As always, Wayne writes what he knows with the clarity and honesty of a door slam. Like the title track, both a tenacious statement of purpose and a straight-up, no-chaser bio, says:

“I love the road and my plans are never to retire, and anyone who says that I will is nothin’ but a liar…cuz that’s how I make my livin’, slingin’ rhythm”

Big Sandy & His Fly-Rite Boys

KEVIN STEWART
// UPRIGHT BASS, HARMONY VOCALS
A long time veteran of the California music scene, Kevin Stewart has lent his highly respected bass talents to such greats as Wanda Jackson, Glen Glenn, Hepcat, and countless others. Kevin has been anchoring the Fly-Rite rhythm section for more than a decade now, with many miles under his belt and beneath his boots.

BIG SANDY
// VOCALS, ACOUSTIC RHYTHM GUITAR
Throughout the 80's, Robert "Big Sandy" Williams put in time with several bands on the Southern California Rockabilly & Roots scene before forming Big Sandy and the Fly-Rite Trio in 1988. With an almost constant touring schedule that has taken the band many times around the globe, Big Sandy continues to to be a key figure on the ever-changing Americana circuit.

FRANKIE HERNANDEZ
// DRUMS
A product of the vibrant Honky-Tonk and Western Swing community in the Pacific Northwest, Frankie Hernandez has found a home away from home in the Fly-Rite drummer's seat over the last couple of years and counting.

ASHLEY KINGMAN
// ELECTRIC LEAD GUITAR
After more than a decade as a highly regarded guitarist on the European Rock & Roll scene, Ashley Kingman left the U.K. in 1993 to join Big Sandy and his Fly-Rite Boys in their musical pursuits. 27 years and more than 125 recordings later, Ashley's signature guitar licks contue to propel the band into the new decade.